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Life

Imagining Your Relatives As Monkeys

We get it, entertaining the visiting relatives isn’t the most enjoyable nor profitable use of your time. But really, cut them some slack – Chinese New Year doesn’t happen every day. While you’re being anti-social by reading this on your phone, let’s take a moment to imagine your relatives as monkeys (Year of the Monkey, yes?) and see if we the ones we chose matched yours. Just a word of warning: if you can’t suppress your uncontrollable giggling, don’t read this out in the open where everyone can see you. We won’t be held responsible for the subsequent death glares…
Longform

New Year, New You, Same Old CNY

I sauntered into the grocery store, basket in one hand, shopping list in another, ready to embark on my usual therapeutic routine: shopping for my beloved groceries and jamming along to the latest Ariana Grande tune while grooving to those insane falsettos. It was then when the sirens of doom hit me. That ridiculously and blaring noise screaming through those accursed speakers; yes, I have heard them before. They are not the alluring tunes sang by mermaids to lead sailors to their doom. They are those fateful songs that play on loop to torture even the coldest of criminals, to shred…
Life

What Would A “Modern” Yu Sheng Look Like?

Yusheng, yee sang or yuu sahng (Chinese: 鱼生), or Prosperity Toss, also known as lo hei (Cantonese for 撈起 or 捞起) is a Teochew-style raw fish salad. Yes, Wikipedia knows more about my own culture than I do. Those who celebrate the hand-shaking, money-gifting, petty gambling festival that is the Chinese New Year would be all too familiar with this messy dish. But while atas restaurants keep trying to find more creative reasons/lucrative ways to sell shredded vegetables, we wondered about how younger generations might adapt this tradition in the future. Basically… What would a “modern” Singaporean Yu Sheng look like? and that’s…
Longform

We Need To Learn How To Accept Compliments This CNY

“Wah your ah boy in secondary school already ah? Heard he score very well leh. Aiyo your ah boy so smart!”   “No lah no lah, he very lazy one.” For many of the larger families in Singapore, the Lunar New Year is a time of compulsory gatherings, discussed and arranged in the usual clandestine manner that middle-aged folks communicate in (i.e. hours of whispering between aunties over a landline). Planning the gathering, however, is nothing compared to being at the actual gathering. Amidst the slightly awkward dialogues and faltering false starts lie the true terror: finding a conversation starter with people…
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